Introducing the OCA Evidence-based Framework Advisory Council

Dr. Sean Batte (Logan University graduate; practising in London area)

Dr. Sean BatteFast facts: Dr. Sean Batte is a graduate of Logan University’s Chiropractic program. He earned an undergraduate and Master of Science degree in Medical Biophysics from the University of Western Ontario and a second undergraduate degree from Logan University. Dr. Batte has been practicing in the London, Ontario area for 19 years.
Dr. Batte is also a member of the Royal Canadian Navy with several command qualifications and is a graduate of the Canadian Forces Staff College.

Question: Why are you joining the OCA Evidence-based Framework Advisory Council?
Dr. Batte: I think there is a real opportunity to unite the profession and make it stronger. This work belongs to the entire profession and we can see it made stronger if we all learn how use evidence and research to our profession’s and patient’s advantage. That’s why I want to participate on this council. My hope is it will give chiropractors more social credibility as evidence is the currency of credibility when paired with an appropriate strategy. Existing and new research, when deployed with a comprehensive implementation plan is vital part of a larger vision to help better serve our communities and patients, inclining more to seek chiropractors out as their first choice for health care.

Question: As a leader in the profession, can you please share any other involvement, whether that is volunteering or mentoring others?
Dr. Batte: I volunteer with the Salvation Army Centre of Hope’s chiropractic clinic. I have volunteered for the London Chiropractic Society and organized seminars. I also served as a chiropractor at the Canada Summer Games and serve as a chiropractic trainer at local amateur sporting events. I have had the pleasure to care for members of Team Canada’s rowing team. I also enjoy mentoring students and new graduates from Logan University who have completed their externships in my clinic or shadowed me. I’ve been a guest lecturer at the University of Western Canada School of Medicine on several occasions to speak about chiropractic to medical students.
Outside the profession, I have raised money for the Soldier On organization for wounded veterans. A few years ago, I led the way to build the multi-million-dollar Battle of the Atlantic Memorial in London Ontario.

I serve in the Royal Canadian Navy Reserves part time. In 2017, I was appointed to Chief of Staff for Central Region (Ontario). In this role, I have 1500 sailors whose readiness and training I am responsible for to the Central Region Captain (Navy). In my ships’ squadron I have seven Naval Reserve Divisions whose sailors must be operationally ready to serve domestically and overseas. The main focus of my mentorship is in ‘leadership’ and ‘command.’

Question: Can you also share your involvement and experience with other parts of the of the broader health system?
Dr Batte: In addition to my work with the University, I am the Vice Chair of the WKY Viking Foundation, which is a multidisciplinary research foundation of health professionals from a number of fields, including chiropractors, physicians, naturopaths and others. Our aim is to conduct research that will demonstrate the benefits of including complementary and alternative health disciplines at a national level.


Dr. Ken Brough: (Palmer College of Chiropractic graduate and practises in Ottawa)

Ken BroughFast facts: Dr. Ken Brough has been involved in the Ontario Chiropractic Association for 12 years in various roles, including his most recent position as Chair of the Board of Directors for the last two years. Dr. Brough was also involved with the Canadian Chiropractic Association (CCA) and the Canadian Chiropractic Clinical Guidelines Initiative (CCGI) as Chair of the Government and Inter-Professional Relations Committee and as a Steering Committee member respectively. Dr. Brough has practiced for 28 years in the Ottawa area, leading his clinics in collaborative care models of practice including chiropractors, physiotherapists and registered massage therapists. As the owner of CURAVITA, he employs a team of over 30 professionals in two locations.

Question: Why are you joining the OCA Evidence-based Framework Advisory Council? What is your motivation?
Dr. Brough: As a member, I did not have a strong understanding of the concepts of evidence-based care; it was an emerging concept for me until I became more involved in the Canadian Chiropractic Association (CCA). I became very familiar when I sat on the committee for Canadian Chiropractic Guidelines Initiative (CCGI). When I fully understood Dr. Sackett’s work in articulating the three pillars of evidence-based care: best available evidence, clinical expertise and patient preference, I saw how that framework was selectively applied. There is not a strong understanding of how the framework relates to daily clinical practice.. Dr Sacketts intention was for all of the pillars of the framework to be applied and we need to support the application of all 3 pillars in patient care.

Question: As a leader in the profession, can you please share any other involvement, whether that is volunteering or mentoring?
Dr. Brough: I was involved with CCA for nine years, largely as a Board member. I’ve served on the OCA Board of Directors for 13 years and have held executive positions, namely Chair, which is the position I hold now.

For four years, I served on the CCGI Steering Committee as the new guidelines initiative was being redeveloped. I was involved in the initial strategic planning for the initiative and helped lay the groundwork for where CCGI is today.

I operate two multidisciplinary practices. All of us work in full wellness-based model. I employ five chiropractors and we all work in a collaborative model. Mentoring my team is very important; I work with them to practice in the framework of the three pillars of evidence-based care. For our younger practitioners, we established a mentoring program in my clinics to leverage the experience of more established chiropractors; this is of great value to the younger associates who feel supported to grow and thrive.

Question: Can you also share your involvement and experience with other parts of the of the broader health system?
Dr. Brough: In clinical practice, we work with a spectrum of professionals, including the medical profession. Through my work with the CCA, I contributed to the foundational work with the Canadian Armed Forces to launch the chiropractic initiative. I presented to the Parliamentary Defence Committee about the potential involvement of chiropractic care for the military. I also worked with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) when it was re-aligning its health policy and utilization for employees.
Also, while working with the CCA, I participated in its efforts to launch a chiropractic program in Nunavut at one Community Health Centre. That work enabled the creation of a legal framework to enable chiropractors to practice legally in the territory.


Dr. Anita Chopra (New York Chiropractic College graduate and practises in Brampton, Oakville and Etobicoke)

Anita ChopraFast facts: Dr. Anita Chopra has been serving the Brampton, Oakville, and Etobicoke area since 2011 after graduating from the New York Chiropractic College. Dr. Chopra received her Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from the University of Western Ontario and is a certified Webster Technique and Rocktape practitioner. Dr. Anita Chopra actively engages her community through guest speaking events with various groups in the Peel region.

Question: Why are you joining the OCA Evidence-based Framework Advisory Council?
Dr. Chopra: I believe that it’s time to have good representation of the profession at hand. We are all busy in our practices, but we need to make time to shed light on what is going on our profession. With a lot of media coverage of our profession, it is important to understand what we do and how we do it.

Question: As a leader in the profession, can you please share any other involvement, whether that is volunteering or mentoring?
Dr. Chopra: I am a regular speaker on injury prevention at The Running Room and speak to pregnant and postpartum women on the importance of chiropractic care. I also have spoken to classes on what chiropractic care is.

Question: Can you also share your involvement and experience with other parts of the of the broader health system?
Dr. Chopra: I have tried setting up referral practices with other health care professionals. It is something that takes time and effort; but it does pay off. Establishing trust and competency is very important when building these practices.


Dr. Marco De Ciantis (CMCC Graduate and practises in North York)

Marco De CiantisFast facts: Dr. Marco De Ciantis has served the North York area for seven years practicing with his twin Dr. Paolo De Ciantis at Sports Specialist Rehab Centre. Dr. Marco De Ciantis has an interest in working with both amateur and professional athletes and provides his services to local football, soccer, and rugby teams regularly as well as both youth and adult Taekwondo athletes at national competitions. Dr. De Ciantis also volunteered his services with the 2015 Pan Am/ParaPan Am games in Toronto.

Dr. Marco De Ciantis was recognized for his outstanding work with the Patient Care award from the Ontario Chiropractic Association in 2018. Dr. De Ciantis has worked to build a collaborative and patient-centred model of care in his career and has attempted to spread this model of care within his community. Dr. De Ciantis also actively engages his community by volunteering within hospitals, local social clubs, charity campaigns, and community health initiatives.

Question: Why are you joining the OCA Evidence based Framework Advisory Council?
Dr. De Ciantis: I’ve spent years since graduating in 2012, speaking with colleagues about potential changes I and we felt could help to steer the profession towards a direction of unification; unification between all the different “factions” so-to-speak in the various practice styles found under the chiropractic umbrella. Joining this Advisory Council is, on one level, putting foot to pavement and actively contributing to such a process. Moreover, this is a journey to help consolidate all the practice philosophies in our profession, improving professional cohesion and enhancing inter-professional collaborations.

Question: As a leader in the profession, can you please share any other involvement, whether that is volunteering or mentoring others?
Dr. De Ciantis: Last year, I joined the Toronto-based humanitarian group, Bridge to Health. I travelled to Uganda back in January/February of this year for two weeks where I worked in the field, in isolated villages in rural Uganda with medical doctors, speech pathologists, a dentist, dental hygienists, researchers, pharmacist and many local support staff delivering MSK (musculo-skeletal) care to individuals who have never received any care, whatsoever. Furthermore, I and another chiropractor worked, side-by-side, with local clinical officers (Uganda’s version of medical doctors), teaching them how to perform proper histories, physical and neurological examinations for MSK conditions and how to treat them. On November 4 of this year, I presented research gained from this experience and previous trips at the American Public Health Associations (APHA) Conference in Philadelphia. We were the only Canadian representatives.

In my personal practice, I mentor undergraduate (chiropractic, naturopathic, kinesiologist) and secondary (high school) students. My clinic acts as a co-op learning facility with local high schools where grade 11-12 students come in and observe multiple days of the week for hours, earning credits. Moreover, I and other chiropractors at the clinic have established interprofessional networks with various physiatrists, medical doctors, personal trainers, pharmacists (local Shoppers Drug Mart), with orthopaedic surgeons in UHN and with private facilities (Pain & Wellness Centre) where interprofessional collaborations and rounds occur every month, bolstering patient-centred health care.


Dr. Peter Emary (New York Chiropractic College graduate and practises in Cambridge)

Peter EmaryFast facts: Dr. Peter Emary has served the Cambridge, Ontario region for 16 years after graduating from the New York Chiropractic College. Dr. Emary has also received a Master of Science in Clinical Sciences degree from Bournemouth University and has a special interest in clinical research and radiology.

Dr. Emary served as the President of the Waterloo Regional Chiropractic Society from 2011 to 2013, during which time the organization was awarded the Ontario Chiropractic Association’s Society of the Year award in both 2011 and 2012. Dr. Emary has also been recognized for his community involvement with the Rotarian of the Year award in 2005 by the Rotary Club of Cambridge (Preston-Hespeler) of which he was a member of for 10 years.

Question: Why are you joining the OCA Evidence-based Framework Advisory Council?
Dr. Emary: I’ve been wanting to get more involved in our profession for years but have often lacked the time to properly do so. However, I couldn’t pass up the chance to be involved in this OCA initiative. Aligning the chiropractic profession with the principles of evidence-based practice is something I’ve been wanting to see happen for a very long time. I’m enthusiastically looking forward to getting involved and participating in the advisory council.

Question: As a leader in the profession, can you please share any other involvement, whether that is volunteering or mentoring?
Dr. Emary: I served on the Executive Board of the Waterloo Regional Chiropractic Society from 2007 to 2013. I served as President of the Society from 2011 to 2013. I worked with a fantastic group of Board Members and am proud that we were awarded the OCA’s ‘Society of the Year’ during my two years as president. We built upon the successes of our previous society Presidents and I am pleased that the Waterloo Regional Chiropractic Society is still as strong today as ever.

Question: Can you also share your involvement and experience with other parts of the broader health system?
Dr. Emary: This past year, I started teaching part-time in the chiropractic department at D’Youville College and am thoroughly enjoying it. I’m teaching a course in evidence-based practice to third-year students; and am helping them to learn how to critically appraise research literature and apply it, combined with clinical experience and patient preference, to managing an individual patient. This year I’ve also started participating in the ISAEC program through Grand River Hospital. This has been a tremendous experience so far and my clinical skills are being greatly enhanced through this program.

We have a really great practice leader and a highly-skilled group of chiropractors on the ISAEC team here; I’m excited to see the impact that this program will have, not only in our region, but across Ontario, in terms of streamlining care and reducing referrals for advanced imaging and spine surgery.

This program is an evidence-based program and is placing Ontario chiropractors on the front line of primary interdisciplinary spine care.
In addition to my clinical practice at the Langs Community Health Centre (CHC) in Cambridge, I’m also fortunate to be working on a Ph.D. at McMaster University. For my thesis, I will be investigating the impact of chiropractic integration on opioid use among chronic back pain patients within the CHC setting.


Dr. Brian Gleberzon: (CMCC graduate and practises in Toronto)

Dr. Brian GleberzonFast facts: Dr. Brian Gleberzon is a researcher, professor, and Chair of the Department of Chiropractic Therapeutics at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College in Toronto. Dr. Gleberzon was involved with the College of Chiropractors of Ontario from 2007 to 2016 and the Ontario Chiropractic Association since 2016 where he currently holds the position of Secretary-Treasurer and serves on the Finance and Audit Committee and the Research Committee.

Dr. Gleberzon has a Master of Health Sciences from the University of Sydney and is completing his Ph.D. from the University of New South Wales. Dr. Gleberzon has practiced in the Toronto area for 30 years. He has also been recognized for his work in the profession and received the OCA’s Professional Service in Research in Chiropractic Award, now known as Researcher of the Year and the OCA’s Professional Service awards in Public Relations Award 2001 and 2008 respectively.

Question: Why are you joining the OCA Evidence-based Framework Advisory Council?
Dr. Gleberzon: I want to ensure the voice of the patient and the voice of the clinician is heard, not just clinical research. I see it as a three-legged stool; we need to remember all three pillars. I want to resolve the friction at the researcher-practitioner interface. I’m a non-linear thinker who wants to deconstruct dogma. I speak truth to power and that is partly why I want to contribute as a member of the Council. I’m not afraid to address difficult conversations.

Question: As a leader in the profession, can you please share any other involvement, whether that is volunteering or mentoring others?
Dr. Gleberzon: I’m President and a founding member of local CUPE union at CCMC. I’m a strong advocate for natural justice and procedural fairness.

One of the small groups I work with is clinical education, deconstructing guidelines and looking at its content. I’m an advocate for challenging dogma. It is how I work and what I am interested in. This is the topic of my Ph.D. triangulation to understand what is really fair and just. To the individual patient, we must be responsible.

There are two areas of research I pioneered. I was the lead author of a study on student injuries. Initially, I received a lot resistance; now other professions are starting to publish similar articles. The second area of research concerns women chiropractors. I surveyed CMCC women whether they were ever sexually harassed by patients. For women, this is an issue. I was the first to publish data for the chiropractic profession. It is an important issue and I’m not afraid to ask the questions; get the data and publish. We learned that most of the harassment occurs in the first five years by male patients.

Question: Can you also share your involvement and experience with other parts of the of the broader health system?
Dr. Gleberzon: I teach at CMCC and run my practice, which is focused mainly on back pain and sports injuries; most of my patients are older adults.

I’ve published many research papers and contributed to various textbooks; I speak at scientific conferences globally. In 2008, I designed the Best Food Forward program for the Canadian Chiropractic Association and presented the program to members of Parliament and senior advisors of the Public Health Agency of Canada.


Sheila Gregory (patient member)

Sheila GregoryFast facts: Sheila Gregory has been a chiropractic patient for more than 30 years. She lives in Newmarket, Ontario.
She has been treated by many different practitioners in the Greater Toronto Area, and has experienced diverse practice styles. Sheila started visiting a chiropractor because of neck and lower back pain experienced at work. She has maintained consistent and ongoing treatment over the years.

Sheila describes her experience with chiropractors as excellent. Their care and expertise has helped her reduce pain and maintain an active lifestyle. Throughout the years, Sheila’s chiropractic needs have evolved and changed, therefore making her an excellent candidate to discuss her diverse set of experiences with chiropractic care. Sheila is motivated to provide insightful and meaningful input into the OCA Evidence-based Framework Advisory Council.

Question: Why are you joining the OCA Evidence-based Framework Advisory Council?
Ms. Gregory: When I learned about the Council from OCA, I realized how many chiropractors I have been treated by over the years (about six or seven) and, for the most part, how much they’ve helped me. I’ve a great respect for chiropractors. I’ve been exposed to a range of treatments and think I can offer an understanding of the patient’s point of view. My personal motivation to contribute to the Council is related to my background in physical education and health promotion/community health.

Question: As our patient member, can you please share any other involvement in chiropractic or any other organizations, whether that is volunteering for an association or mentoring others? Specifically, have you served as a patient or representative with other organizations?
Ms. Gregory: I’ve not been involved in the chiropractic profession or as patient representative in any other organization. Past volunteer activities include serving as a board director for a homeless shelter and serving on the executive of my professional association.

Question: Can you also share your involvement and experience with other parts of the of the broader health system, for example, as a patient or as a health advocate for a family member or friend?
Ms. Gregory: As a health care advocate for my parents going through the aging process and the end of their lives, I’m familiar with the excellence and the challenges patients experience when navigating the health care system. As a former employee of Dying With Dignity Canada (DWDC), I worked with health care professionals who served as board directors and/or members of the Physicians Advisory Council. My experience at DWDC gave me an understanding of how, sometimes, health care provider beliefs, professional codes, institutional policies, and legislative restrictions can be in direct conflict with patients’ desires and/or rights.


Dr. Glen M. Harris (CMCC Graduate and practises in mid-town Toronto)

Glen HarrisFast facts: Dr. Glen M. Harris has been active in the chiropractic sports care community after graduating from the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College with his Doctor of Chiropractic and the Royal College of Chiropractic Sports Sciences (Canada)
Dr. Harris served on the Executive Board of the Royal College of Chiropractic Sports Sciences (Canada) from 2002 to 2016 and is also a past President of the organization from 2010 to 2012. Dr. Harris has also been the North American (Canada) representative on the International Federation of Sports Chiropractic /Fédération Internationale de Chiropratique du Sport (FICS) since 2012.
Dr. Harris is an Assistant Professor at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College in the Division of Clinical Education where he supervises clinical interns Dr. Harris continues to practice in Toronto and is the President of MSK+, a continuing education company for chiropractors and allied health professionals.

Question: Why are you joining the OCA Evidence-based Framework Advisory Council?
Dr. Harris: I’m committed to the advancement of the chiropractic profession. I’ve served in leadership positions at the national and international level through the Royal College of Chiropractic Sports Sciences (RCCSS Canada). I have served in leadership positions at the national and international level through the International Federation of Sports Chiropractic /Fédération Internationale de Chiropratique du Sport (FICS).

I’ve supervised chiropractic interns for twenty years; now this is an opportunity to assist and serve the profession at the provincial level.

Question: As a leader in the profession, can you please share any other involvement, whether that is volunteering or mentoring?
Dr. Harris: I’ve been involved with a significant amount of teaching in my clinician role at the CMCC. I’ve mentored and supervised over forty sets of interns, ranging in sizes of 7 to 9 interns per set. In that role, I supervise fourth-year students for six-month clinical internship rotations at the South Riverdale clinic where we have an inter-referral process with the clinic’s physicians, nurse practitioners and others. I’ve been in this role for ten years.

I’ve been a supervisor on student research projects; I also served on the Research Ethics Board (REB) at CMCC.
I’m proud to volunteer as a member of the host medical services at the Canada Games with the Team Ontario men’s softball team. For the 2010 Paralympic Winter Games, held in Vancouver, I served in the clinic for the duration of the games so that all athletes had access to healthcare services. I performed the same role for the 2015 Pan American and Para Pan American Games, held in Greater Toronto Area.

Question: Can you also share your involvement and experience with other parts of the of the broader health system?
Dr. Harris: In my work with the Canada Games, Vancouver 2010 Paralympic and Toronto 2015 Pan Am and Para Pan Am games, I worked in polyclinics with a full range of health professionals.

In my private practice, I work in an integrated multidisciplinary practice, alongside physiotherapists and registered massage therapists. I have a private company called, MSK+, which provides continuing education to physicians, nurses and all health professionals, specifically on manual therapy, soft tissue, therapeutic exercises and education. The company has been in operation for 10 years.


Dr. Deborah Kopansky-Giles (CMCC graduate working in Greater Toronto Area)

Deborah Kopansky GilesFast facts: Dr. Deborah Kopansky-Giles, DC, FCCS(C), FICC (Hons), M.Sc., is a Professor at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC), an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto and a staff chiropractor at Unity Health Toronto (St. Michael’s Hospital), Department of Family and Community Medicine.
Dr. Kopansky-Giles attained her Fellowship in Chiropractic Clinical Sciences in 1993 and completed her M.Sc. in 2010. She has served on the organizing committees for numerous conferences including, the World Federation of Chiropractic (WFC) 10th Biennial Congress in Montreal (2009) as conference Co-Chair, the Bone and Joint Decade World Network meetings in Vietnam (2012), Brazil (2013), London (2014) and Berlin (2017) in addition to her role as a member of the Health Services Committee, the XVI International AIDS Conference in Toronto in 2006 which attracted over 28,000 delegates.

Question: Why are you joining the OCA Evidence-based Framework Advisory Council?
Dr. Kopansky-Giles: I’ve been involved for many years being on the policy/political side for my profession, including nine years on the OCA Board of Directors, six years on the CCA Board and 15 years on the World Federation of Chiropractic (WFC) as the Canadian representative. So, I bring provincial, national and international experience to the Council.
As an clinician, educator and researcher, I am motivated to help ensure that our profession is evidence-based, integrated into the health system and accessible to all Ontarians. I’m driven by how we can best serve people because I believe it is all about the patient. I want to continue to bring that perspective to this work. For me, it always comes down to helping people who are suffering and not about my profession’s or my own motivation.

Question: As a leader in the profession, can you please share any other involvement, whether that is volunteering or mentoring?
Dr. Kopansky-Giles: I’m highly motivated to advance the profession believe in the importance of contributing to our communities through my work and through volunteerism.

In 2000, the United Nations declared 2000-2010 the Bone and Joint Decade to shine a light on this global issue and to seek specific attention to those areas. With the UN declaration, the World Health Organization (WHO) encouraged the development of the international Bone and Joint Decade (BJD), comprised of expert health professionals working to create an agenda and build momentum around advocacy for bone and joint conditions. For the past 15 years, I’ve been involved in this BJD work – (now known as the Global Alliance for Musculoskeletal Health) as a member of the International Coordinating Council and on the Executive Committee since 2010. In that capacity, I’ve had the privilege of working with global leaders from many professions and patient organizations. This has enabled me to broaden my perspective significantly with respect to global health issues and the integral role that chiropractors can have locally and around the world as primary spine care providers.

Over the past 35 years, I’ve had the privilege of being involved in a wide diversity of organizations (local, provincial, national and international), participating on various boards and committees. As a few examples: a research agenda council for the AIDS Bureau of Canada, The Ontario HIV Treatment Network,, the Ontario Rehabilitation Council, various Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (MOHLTC) quality committees, the Financial Services Commission of Ontario Accident Benefits Advisory Committee, the World Spine Care (WSC) Canada board, the Global Spine Care Initiative Scientific Secretariat, and many others. Down the road, I am looking at ‘retirement’ plans for continuing work with WSC with our programs in Botswana, India, Ghana and Dominican Republic.

Question: Can you also share your involvement and experience with other parts of the of the broader health system?
Dr. Kopansky-Giles: I’m deeply involved in the education of chiropractors and other learners. As a Professor at CMCC; I supervise our CMCC graduate chiropractic training program at St. Michael’s Hospital. I also teach in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto (UoT) where my teaching involves educating family medicine learners, teaching medical faculty (faculty development) and also international students in the Global Health Program.

For four years, I was privileged to co-chair a national working group for the College of Family Physicians Canada; where we developed teaching and assessment tools for the CanMEDS Collaborator Role competency. These tools are available open access on the CFPC website for all health professional educators.

Over the past 15 years, I’ve been actively engaged in the evolution of our integrative model of care in family medicine at St. Michael’s Hospital. The St. Michael’s Hospital program was the first time in Canada that chiropractors were integrated as clinicians and educators into an academic health science centre. This program was identified by the federal government as a exemplar for primary care innovation in 2012 and by the World Health Organization in 2016 as a global leading practice. I was honoured to co-lead a national webinar for Canada Human Health Resources about our model, reaching 65 ministry of health-related organizations across Canada. Our model of care is team-based and non-hierarchical, patient centred and continuing to evolve through a social determinants of health lens.
The St. Michael’s Hospital model continues to evolve in creative ways; chiropractors are fully integrated team members, collaborating on an innovative primary care team which also includes dentists, psychologists, legal literacy services, income security services to help people navigate the our complex social support system and so forth; structured to minimize barriers to accessing care, including economic barriers.

I am fortunate to work with the WHO Global Health Workforce, Healthy Ageing and Integrated, People-Centred Health Services programs on behalf of the WFC and G-MUSC; to advocate for priority of musculoskeletal health and to ensure that chiropractors are seen as essential contributors to the global health workforce and in helping to reduce the burden of spine and musculoskeletal disorders on people around the world.

In the decades since my graduation, I have seen incredible advancement of chiropractic in Canada and I’m very excited to see this continue to evolve with the good work that chiropractors do every day in their practices, with the excellent education and research our profession contributes to and with the leadership that the OCA has given in strengthening chiropractic in Ontario.


Dr. Keshena Malik (CMCC Graduate and practises in the Hamilton area)

Keshena MalikFast facts: Dr. Keshena Malik has been in practice for 10 years in the Greater Hamilton area in a multidisciplinary, collaborative clinical setting, including chiropractors, physiotherapists and registered massage therapists.
Dr. Malik is an Advanced Practice Provider with the Low Back Pain Rapid Access Clinic (formerly ISAEC). Dr. Malik also completed her Master of Science in Rehabilitation Sciences from McMaster University. Dr. Malik is also the Co-chair of the McMaster Chiropractic Working Group and is a regular guest speaker with McMaster’s Program for Interprofessional Practice, Education and Research. Dr. Malik is involved in the Ontario Chiropractic Association as a member of the Board of Directors, serving on the Research Committee, Strategic Planning Task Force and volunteering as a Chiropractic Educator for the OCA’s Community Engagement and Leadership Program.

Question: Why are you joining the OCA Evidence-based Framework Advisory Council?
Dr. Malik: I endorse evidence-based chiropractic care. I am motivated by and passionate about disseminating knowledge of this evidence-based framework to our colleagues, stakeholders and patients, as well as aiding in providing an inclusive understanding of this framework in support of its application to and shaping of our profession.

Question: As a leader in the profession, can you please share any other involvement, whether that is volunteering or mentoring?
Dr. Malik: For the past six years, I have been involved in mentoring through McMaster University’s Program for Interprofessional Practice, Education and Research (PIPER) as a guest speaker, educating students (including medical, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, midwifery, nursing) about the chiropractic profession. I also volunteer as a group facilitator at Interprofessional Education (IPE) events, which include sessions facilitating students from the McMaster University Faculty of Health Sciences programs to learn from and about their colleagues training and scope of practice in each program.

Question: Can you also share your involvement and experience with other parts of the of the broader health system?
Dr. Malik: In my clinical practice, I have developed referral relationships with allopathic, allied and complementary and alternative health professionals in order to provide the most effective patient-centred care. I feel it is imperative to understand each profession’s scope of practice while considering patient preferences to ensure the most appropriate care.
In terms of new approaches to interprofessional practice, in addition to guest speaking at various IPE events, I also have training in the Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative (CIHC) Competency Framework. I feel that interprofessional collaboration should be the hallmark of every profession.


Dr. Bernadette Murphy (CMCC Graduate and practises in the Greater Toronto Area)

Bernadette MurphyFast facts: Dr. Bernadette Murphy is involved in patient care and the advancement of the chiropractic profession in both Canada and New Zealand. Dr. Murphy received her BA in Life Sciences from Queen’s University and Doctor of Chiropractic from the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College before heading to New Zealand to complete her Master of Science and Ph.D. in Human Neurophysiology from the University of Auckland. While in New Zealand, Dr. Murphy was the Director of Research at the New Zealand College of Chiropractic and then accepted a lectureship in the Department of Sport and Exercise Science at the University of Auckland. Dr. Murphy developed a Master of Science in Exercise Rehabilitation at the University of Auckland. Throughout this time, Dr. Murphy maintained a clinical practice.

In 2008 Dr. Murphy returned to Ontario as a faculty member at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology to expand its Bachelor of Health Science degree with a Kinesiology program.

Question: Why are you joining the OCA Evidence-based Framework Advisory Council?
Dr. Murphy: As a clinician, I have a firm commitment to evidence-based practice. As a basic science researcher, I understand the challenges of running the studies to collect the data to create the evidence. It’s important to understand that “absence of evidence” is not “evidence of absence.” I bring that dual expertise to my work with the OCA Evidence-based Framework Advisory Council.

Question: As a leader in the profession, can you please share any other involvement, whether that is volunteering mentoring?
Dr. Murphy: Over the years, I have mentored a number of chiropractors and future chiropractors as a research supervisor. Ensuring that the chiropractic profession has clinicians with strong backgrounds in critical thinking and interpreting research evidence is an important part of the profession “coming of age.”

Question: Can you also share your involvement and experience with other parts of the of the broader health system?
Dr. Murphy: Over the years, in both Canada and New Zealand, I have taught students from chiropractic, medicine, nursing, physiology and kinesiology. What always strikes me is that, regardless of discipline, students struggle with the same concepts. I think that interprofessional education is an important part of breaking down stereotypes. I am privileged that my work is recognized globally; I am a recipient of the WFC best scientific paper award in 1995 and 2015. I was the New Zealand Chiropractor of the Year (2004); I received the 2010 OCA award for most significant contributions to research; I was honoured with the Earl Homewood CMCC Professorship in 2013 and 2014, and the UOIT Research Excellence Award in 2014 for excellence in research acknowledged as being of international calibre.


Dr. Paul Nolet (CMCC graduate and practises in Guelph)

Dr. Paul NoletFast facts: Dr. Paul Nolet has provided chiropractic services in both Ontario and Harare, Zimbabwe for 36 years and is currently practicing in Guelph, Ontario. Dr. Nolet’s practice emphasizes pain relief and functional restoration within an interprofessional setting in the Ontario ISAEC program and at Wellington Ortho and Rehab where he works with chiropractors, physiotherapists, massage therapists, orthopedic surgeons and a physical medicine specialist as the Director of Chiropractic Services.
Dr. Paul Nolet received a Master of Science in Sports Health Science from Life University, a Master of Public Health in Health Studies from Lakehead University, is a Fellow of the Royal College of Chiropractic Sports Sciences, an Internationally Certified Chiropractic Sports Practitioner, and a nonsurgical member of the Canadian Spine Society. Dr. Nolet is completing his Ph.D. in Forensic Medicine from the Care and Public Research Institute at Maastricht University in the Netherlands. Dr. Nolet’s research focuses on the risk factors of back and next pain from the view of musculoskeletal epidemiology. Dr. Paul Nolet has served on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Chiropractic Examining Board since 2013.

Question: Why are you joining the OCA Evidence-based Framework Advisory Council?
Dr. Nolet: We’ve known for a while that many conditions like back pain, neck pain and headaches for instance, have a large burden of illness on the health system. With our profession’s growing research and clinical guideline initiatives that show that many of the treatments chiropractors do to be effective for the treatment of many musculoskeletal conditions, it is time for the profession to move toward playing a more significant role in the province’s health system. I would like to be involved in moving our profession in that direction.

Question: As a leader in the profession, can you please share any other involvement, whether that is volunteering for a sports team or mentoring others?
Dr. Nolet: Early in my chiropractic career, I practiced for almost five years in Harare, Zimbabwe. I practiced in one of the main medical centres and was able to spend time observing surgery with orthopaedic and neurosurgeons. I was also able to get involved in the local community. I understand cultural sensitivity and the complexity of what is in front of you. I joined another Canadian chiropractor and his family and we practiced together.

Question: Can you also share your involvement and experience with other parts of the broader health system, for example, teaching, establishing referral practices with other health professionals or new approaches to interprofessional practice?
Dr. Nolet: I volunteered for several years on a committee with the Waterloo Wellington Local Health Integration Network (LHIN). For the last few years, I chaired the Health Professions Advisory Committee and was able to get a glimpse of what the health system has to provide for Ontarians. I was involved in the Pan Am games 2015, supporting cyclists; I’ve also worked at the Pre-Pan American games at both the national and international levels.

I completed my Master of Public Health on neck injuries in car accidents. My thesis was compIeted at Toronto Western Hospital at the Centre for Research Expertise for Improved Disability Outcomes (CREIDO) that was funded by the WSIB.
When I am not practicing, I am working on my Ph.D. in Forensic Medicine through Maastricht University. I have been able to publish my research in journals such as Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, European Spine Journal and The Spine Journal. I’ve published 15 articles and counting.


Dr. Antonio “Tony” Ottaviano (Life University graduate and practises in the Niagara area)

Dr. Antonio “Tony” OttavianoFast facts: Dr. Antonio Ottaviano received his Doctor of Chiropractic from Life University and has been involved in the chiropractic profession in Ontario for much of his career. Dr. Ottaviano has contributed content for orienting new graduates to OCA materials, organized chiropractic seminars in the Niagara area, and is a former President of the Niagara Chiropractic Society. Dr. Ottaviano has practiced in both Alberta and Ontario and has been servicing the St. Catherine’s region for the last 36 years, the last 10 of which he has been joined by his son. Dr. Antonio Ottaviano was actively involved with local soccer clubs and was the coach for a team for many years.
Question: Why are you joining the OCA Evidence based Framework Advisory Council?
Dr. Ottaviano: My personal motivation for volunteering for the Advisory Council is my concern about some of the disturbing trends being propagated by members of our own profession that are taking hold in our profession both outside Canada and most recently within Canada and our province.

Specifically:
The trend in Britain and Australia of prohibiting chiropractors from adjusting children and, closer to home, the recent moratorium by the British Columbia College of Chiropractors prohibiting the adjusting of children below the age of two.

  1. The trend of disparaging and discouraging the use of x-ray in the overall assessment of a chiropractic patient
  2. The trend toward the abandonment of the term subluxation and minimizing the essence of our care, the chiropractic adjustment and its effect on the nervous system.
  3. The trend toward minimizing and disparaging the second and third pillars of the evidence- based practice framework which are clinical expertise and patient values and preferences over the first pillar, best available evidence.
  4. The trend toward members of our profession disparaging fellow members in the press versus dealing the issue amongst ourselves.

I’m entering my 40th year in practice. Having practiced for that period of time and having seen changes in patients’ health and wellbeing that could not always be backed up by a double-blind controlled study, I am concerned that a strictly evidence-based first-tier agenda to determine what chiropractors can and can’t do undermines what I have witnessed firsthand in patients. Research should be directed towards understanding why we see the results we do and how we can improve on those outcomes further. I understand that making outlandish claims is damaging to the profession in the public’s eye; but by the same token we cannot look to push for regulatory castration of our services because research may not have caught up with what I have seen improve in my patients with a regular program of chiropractic care, which has at its core the spinal adjustment.

My goal is that, with respectful discussion, we can forge a clear plan forward that incorporates the evidence- based framework to strengthen and empower our profession, not weaken it for the future generation of chiropractors in our province.

Question: As a leader in the profession, can you please share any other involvement , whether that is volunteering or mentoring?
Dr. Ottaviano: In the past, I served as president of the Niagara Chiropractic Society for two terms, at which time my focus was on bringing together the members in our district, regardless of their practice styles or philosophical leanings. My personal approach was, “what can I do to help my fellow chiropractors become more successful in practice and provide better care for our patients?” I organized diverse monthly speakers for our luncheon meeting, as well as quarterly evening seminars, bringing in high-profile speakers in our profession with the goal of empowering the members with speakers on science, philosophy and art, including practice management, technique, X-ray and motivation. Those seminars were attended by over 100 chiropractors and staff and were extremely well received.
I was involved with the James Carter Associates practice management program as a lecturer and also served in helping members in the assessment of their practices and the incorporation of practice management procedures and staff training. I was on the executive of a minor soccer association in our city and coached a competitive boys’ team for 10 years, travelling across Canada the U.S. and Europe for competitive showcase tournaments.


Dr. Rod Overton (CMCC Graduate and practises in the London area)

Dr. Rod OvertonFast facts: Dr. Rod Overton has been serving the London area for 27 years with a wide variety of techniques and is actively involved with the community as a guest speaker with various groups, businesses, and schools. Dr. Overton has studied many chiropractic adjusting techniques over his career, including diversified, Talsky tonal technique, MC2, and has most recently been witnessing great changes with OTZ chiropractic technique. Dr. Overton’s activities have been recognized by the Ontario Chiropractic Association for his work with the Professional Service Award in Public Relations in 2011.

Question: Why are you joining the OCA Evidence-based Framework Advisory Council?
Dr. Overton: I had no idea what chiropractic was really about when I started chiropractic college. A good friend of ours was a chiropractor and he helped our family with some injuries. He was a kind and gentle man with a strong passion for what he was doing. When he suggested that I should become a chiropractor, I thought that it seemed like a good way to help people and make a living. I didn’t know that it would change my life.

I was shocked when I began to learn how much your health could benefit through chiropractic care. During my teens, I suffered with a seemingly endless series of colds. Mononucleosis, strep throat and pneumonia were an unpleasant part of my university experience. When I started receiving regular chiropractic care, I stopped getting sick all the time. I still suffered the occasional cold but not nearly as often as before. Even more importantly, I began to realize that my new profession offered me a brand new perspective on health, and how the body works.

I hope that the work of the council will have a great effect on how the public, the government and industry, perceives the chiropractic profession. That makes it extremely important and I’m excited to be a part of that.”

Question: As a leader in the profession, can you please share any other involvement, whether that is volunteering or mentoring others?
Dr. Overton: I organize chiropractic events and run a volunteer chiropractic clinic at the Salvation Army Centre of Hope that has operated for eight years. I’ve also given back to the chiropractic profession as the president of the London Chiropractic Society from 1994 to 1995, as well as from 2008 to 2012.

Question: Can you also share your involvement and experience with other parts of the broader health system?
Dr. Overton: I really enjoy being involved in organizing chiropractic events and bringing various speakers to London. I served as president of the London Chiropractic Society in 1994/1995 and from 2008 – 2012. I have inspired and educated many people through presentations on various health-related topics, at many schools, organizations and businesses. I’ve run a volunteer chiropractic clinic for people in need at the Salvation Army Centre of Hope since 2011. I’m proud that more than 20 chiropractors have been involved with the Salvation Army Centre of Hope clinic over the years.